Jim and miss watson relationship problems

Huckleberry Finn - Wikipedia

jim and miss watson relationship problems

The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim are central to Mark Twain's " The from them that motivates his unlawful act of running away from Miss Watson. The trials and tribulations of coping with the issues of a white society haunt. Tom wants to tie Jim up, but the more practical Huck objects, so Tom settles for Miss Watson calls him a fool, and the Widow Douglas later explains that prayer netted the boys only a few doughnuts and jam but a fair amount of trouble. In chapter 16 he refers to Miss Watson as Jim's “rightful owner”(Adventures However, in chapter 6, he laments his own similar relationship with the Watsons: “I.

jim and miss watson relationship problems

Huck is consistently dealing with moral dilemmas; he does not want to tie Jim up even though Tom does. When Huck is in the presence of Tom it becomes extremely difficult for Huck to stay true to his morals and ideals because he is still just a young boy, and becomes vulnerable to people who are of his age. Unlike his relationship with Jim, Huck does not feel the comfort that he feels when he is in the presence of Jim. He is witnessing the spoils of society, Jim belongs to Widow Douglas, and yet he believes that deep down Widow is a woman who has good intentions.

Huck has come to terms with the fact that it takes a strong person not to fall so easily into prejudices and assumptions. He views Widow Douglas as a person who is just blinded by nature. Huck is surrounded with people around him who are consistently making him to put thought into his views about certain aspects of the society that he resides in.

Huck goes with the most powerful motivation to set Jim free no matter what the cost may be for him.

jim and miss watson relationship problems

Huck has not only come to the realization that Jim is a real person, but that they have developed a very unique relationship. This realization of Jim is one that Huck straightforwardly accepts because of the way he is easily accepting of ideas, and thoughts. Huck not only realizes that Jim is a human being, but he also comes to terms with the fact that Jim is a good person, and has an extremely good heart.

Jim has one of the few well functioning families in the novel. Although he has been estranged from his wife and children, he misses them dreadfully, and it is only the thought of a lasting separation from them that motivates his unlawful act of running away from Miss Watson. Jim is rational about his situation and must find ways of accomplishing his goals without provoking the fury of those who could turn him in.

Regardless of the restrictions and constant fear Jim possesses he consistently acts as a gracious human being and a devoted friend.

Huckleberry Finn project:Miss Watson by Ben Simmons on Prezi

In fact, Jim could be described as the only existent adult in the novel, and the only one who provides an encouraging, decent example for Huck to follow. The people that surround Huck who are supposed to be teaching him of morals, and not to fall into the down falls of society are the exact people who need to be taught the lessons of life by Jim.

jim and miss watson relationship problems

Jim conveys an honesty that makes the dissimilarity between him and the characters around him evident. Jim expresses a yearning for his family and admitting his imperfections as a father when he reminisces of the time he hit his little girl for something she could not help.

Jim is comes to the realization of how indecent he was towards his daughter just shows how capable he is as a human being to admit his inaccuracy, and be grateful for his family. Jim accomplishes this task effortlessly because he innately cares for his family the way every father should. Jim makes sure that he shelters Huck from some of the ghastly terrors that they come across, including the corpse of Pap.

The definitive symbol of freedom for Huck and Jim is the Mississippi river. For Jim the river represents his escape from the society that has him captured and enslaved, and for Huck the river is freedom from the society that causes him to question his morals. However, they both soon become conscious of the fact that they are not completely free from the very issues that they have so eagerly escaped.

The trials and tribulations of coping with the issues of a white society haunt Huck and Jim from the beginning of their journey to the end. The duke and the dauphin represent the consistent pattern of phony and staggering people Huck and Jim encounter. Even though the duke and the dauphin are the representation of the unpleasant society that exists they are on of the causes of a union of two people that come from very different sides. Huck is an archetypal innocent, able to discover the "right" thing to do despite the prevailing theology and prejudiced mentality of the South of that era.

The best example of this is his decision to help Jim escape slavery, even though he believes he will go to hell for it see Christian views on slavery. His favorite words is "bully" and "ornery". His appearance is described in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. He wears the clothes of full-grown men which he probably received as charity, and as Twain describes him, "he was fluttering with rags. Even Tom Sawyer, the St.

Jim, Huckleberry Finn Relationship | Study Guides and Book Summaries

Petersburg hamlet boys' leader sees him as "the banished Romantic". Tom's Aunt Polly calls Huck a "poor motherless thing. Huck has a carefree life free from societal norms or rules, stealing watermelons and chickens and "borrowing" boats and cigars. Due to his unconventional childhood, Huck has received almost no education. At the end of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Huck is adopted by the Widow Douglas, who sends him to school in return for his saving her life.

In the course of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn he learns enough to be literate and even reads books for entertainment when there isn't anything else to do.

His knowledge of history as related to Jim is wildly inaccurate, but it is not specified if he is being wrong on purpose as a joke on Jim. Huck's father takes him from her, but Huck manages to fake his own death and escape to Jackson's Island, where he coincidentally meets up with Jim, a slave who was owned by the Widow Douglas' sister, Miss Watson.

Jim is running away because he overheard Miss Watson planning to "sell him South" for eight hundred dollars. Jim wants to escape to Cairo, Illinois, where he can find work to eventually buy his family's freedom.

Huckleberry Finn

Huck and Jim take a raft down the Mississippi Riverplanning to head north on the Ohio River, in hopes of finding freedom from slavery for Jim and freedom from Pap for Huck. Their adventures together, along with Huck's solo adventures, comprise the core of the book. In the end, however, Jim gains his freedom through Miss Watson's death, as she freed him in her will.

Pap, it is revealed, has died in Huck's absence, and although he could safely return to St. Petersburg, Huck plans to flee west to Indian Territory.

Petersburg again after the events of his eponymous novel. In Abroad, Huck joins Tom and Jim for a wild, fanciful balloon ride that takes them overseas.